Photography

There are many types of art photography out there that show a new way of viewing things like infrared photography, micro and macro photography, lomography, light photography, and many others. In this article we will talk about infrared photography, a type of photography that captures the unseen beauty of nature made possible by technology.

What is Infrared Photography?

First we need to know what is infrared. Remember the saying that what you see is just an illusion? That is actually true, and that what you see is the only thing you’re ‘made’ to see. Look above you, you’ll probably see your ceiling. That is because the light that touches its surface is seen by you, called visible light. To give you an idea of the things you can’t see, think of ultraviolet, x-rays, gamma rays, infrared, microwave, and radio. These compose the electromagnetic spectrum, and only the visible light part is what we can see under naked eye.

Emspectrum

Chart taken from Wikipedia

If you’ll take time to study the chart above you’ll be amazed at how little our eyes can see of our surroundings. We only see a portion of the world as it is, and that’s a good thing. Imagine seeing every wavelength, I think that would be like looking at an old television’s static.

So, the point here is, before you even begin infrared photography you need to have a grasp of what it is you’re doing in order to pass on the knowledge. In infrared photography, you basically take a peek into the unseeable by manipulating your tools. You can either use a standard camera or a digital camera, but alterations and post-processing is needed to achieve a great photo.

In a sense, infrared photography is an attempt to view the world in a different manner, similar to using a microscope to see little life forms or using an x-ray to see through things. Venturing through Flickr I’ve been awed by the amazing world out there that we can’t see, but now can due to advances in technology.

Before the introduction of color photography, photographers used filters and black and white negatives to manipulate the final result, especially when they wanted to achieve infrared photography.

I’m not a photographer nor do I claim I know how to do infrared photography, I am simply so amazed by the process that I thought I’d share this with you. I did some research for people who want to enter infrared photography and found this very in-depth guide by Rob about infrared photography. Tutorial includes how to setup everything up to post-processing.  Here is his Flickr page.

Examples of Infrared Photography

Take note that you can buy their prints if you happen to fall in love with them! Don’t forget to click on the links for more IR photographs.

Straightforward Path Infrared by ilimel

1

Orchard Infrared II by dingodave

2

iNfraRed series – terengganu 1 by shin-ex

3

Barn in Infrared by Pak T

4

The gilded River by Anrold

5

Barbados Infrared by Infrared-Land

6

Arte moderno en IR by Goku Abreu

7

Cloudy Day by RoeiG

8

Monroe Arts Center-IR by Marc Kohlbauer

9

Warm Feelings IR by caithness155

10

Read more »

Taken by some great photographers, these are some amazing pictures that portrait nicely, in many ways, part of our galaxy. I’m thinking about taking a few like these… and I wonder if you got your own pictures of the Milky Way. If you do, please share it with us! And don’t forget to visit each photographer (by clicking in each picture) to show them some love! They’ll appreciate it! I hope you enjoy these. Cheers! ;)

Reid Wolcott


Beautiful Milky Way Photography

Jose Francisco Salgado

The Milky Way over the Karoo

A. J. Meeker

Milky Way
Read more »

A Silicon Valley start-up is expected on Wednesday to unveil plans to sell a new kind of still camera which generates an image that can be refocused by viewers after its creation.

The closely held company, Lytro Inc., says its technology will offer consumers an array of benefits—including all but eliminating focus problems in taking pictures and allowing users to generate 3-D images with one rather than two cameras.

LytroLytro’s camera lets users shift focus to the foreground or background.

 

 

Lytro’s approach springs from Stanford University research into what are often called light-field cameras, which capture much more information to create an image than conventional digital cameras. While scientists have discussed the underlying concept for a century, most previous experiments have required as many as a hundred cameras and heavy-duty computing power.

Read more »

If you want to participate and share your graphic design inspiration, just send us, via email, the image with the link from where you found it, also use “Daily Inspiration” in the subject.

al b sure

Digital art selected=

Digital art selected=

Digital art selected=

Digital art selected=

Digital art selected=

Read more »

If you want to participate and share your graphic design inspiration, just send us, via email, the image with the link from where you found it, also use “Daily Inspiration” in the subject.

Al b sure

Digital art selected=

Digital art selected=

Digital art selected=

Digital art selected=

Digital art selected=

Read more »